All Hands on Deck: Learning Adventures Aboard Old Ironsides
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USS Constitution, Johnson


All Hands on Deck: Learning Adventures Aboard "Old Ironsides" Related to the New Mexico Social Studies Standards

Grades K-4
K-4 Benchmark I-B — United States:
Understand connections among historical events, people, and symbols significant to United States history and cultures.

Grade
Performance Standards
K
  • Demonstrate an awareness of community leaders.
1
  • Identify the significance of United States historical events and symbols (e.g. Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Veterans Day, United States flag, bald eagle).
  • Identify and recognize major political and social figures in the United States.
2
  • Describe the cultural diversity of individuals and groups and their contributions to United States history (e.g., George Washington, Ben Franklin, César Chávez, Rosa Parks, National Association for Advancement of Colored People [NAACP], tribal leaders, American Indian Movement [AIM]).
3
  • Describe local events and their connections to state history.
4
  • Describe local events and their connections and relationships to national history.
  • Constitution Concentration, a game of memory and matching pairs (18)
  • First, Second, Third..., making a timeline (18)
  • World Exploring, understanding other places, other cultures (97)
  • Making a Display, matching language and images (109)

 

K-4 Benchmark I-D — Skills: Understand time passage and chronology.

Grade
Performance Standards
K
  • Understand the concept of past and present.
1
  • Demonstrate the use of timelines in order to show events in relation to one another.
2
  • Correctly sequence historical events.
3
  • Interpret information from multiple resources and contexts to determine chronological relationships.
4
  • Describe and explain how historians and archaeologists provide information about people in different time periods.
  • Constitution Concentration, a game of memory and matching pairs (18)
  • First, Second, Third..., making a timeline (18)
  • Wheel of Change, observing detail and understanding a process (103)

 

K-4 Benchmark III-A: Know the fundamental purposes, concepts, structures, and functions of local state, tribal, and national governments.

Grade
Performance Standards
K
  • Identify authority figures and describe their roles (e.g., parents, teachers, principal, superintendent, police, public officials).
1
  • Understand the purpose of rules and identify examples of rules and the consequences of breaking them.
  • Describe different groups and rules that apply to them (e.g., families, classrooms, communities). 
2
  • Understand the purposes of government.
  • Describe and compare class rules made by direct democracy (entire class votes on the rules) and by  representative democracy (class elects a smaller group to make the rules).
3
  • Explain the basic structure and functions of local governments.
  • Describe and give examples of "public good."
  • Explain how New Mexico helps to form a nation with other states.
4
  • Explain how the organization of New Mexico’s government changed during its early history.
  • Compare how the State of New Mexico serves national interests and the interests of New Mexicans.
  • Explain the difference between making laws, carrying out the laws, and determining if the laws have been broken, and identify the government bodies that perform these functions at the local, state, tribal, and national levels
  • Coloring, Counting and Chain of Command, putting objects in order (42)
  • Skipper Says, a team activity to build discipline, memory and quick response (79)

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Grades 5-8
5-8 Benchmark I-A — New Mexico:
Explore and explain how people and events have influenced the development of New Mexico up to the present day.

Grade
Performance Standards
5-8
  • Describe changes of governance of New Mexico (e.g., indigenous, Spanish, Mexican, French, Texan, United States).
  • Explain the reasons for European exploration of the Americas.

 

5-8 Benchmark I-B — United States: Analyze and interpret major eras, events, and individuals from the periods of exploration and colonization through the Civil War and Reconstruction in United States history.

Grade
Performance Standards
5-8
  • Explain early representative government and identify democratic practices that emerged (e.g., Iroquois Nation model, town meetings, assemblies).

 

5-8 Benchmark I-D — Skills: Research historical events and people from a variety of perspectives.

Grade
Performance Standards
5-8
  • Differentiate between, locate, and use primary and secondary sources (e.g., computer software, interviews, biographies, oral histories, print, visual material, artifacts) to acquire information.
  • Use resources for historical information (e.g., libraries, museums, historical societies, courthouse, world wide web, family records, elders).
  • Gather, organize, and interpret information using a variety of media and technology.
  • Show the relationship between social contexts and events.
  • Use effective communication skills and strategies to share research findings.
  • What Happened When, creating at time line (22)
  • A Personal Point of View, conveying the facts (57)
  • Victory in the News, reading an historical, secondary source (62)
  • Eyewitness Account, reading a primary source (63)
  • Hear Ye, Hear Ye! writing a broadside (69)
  • Poetry Power, understanding the power of words (104-5)
  • Writing an Artifact, describing, relating form and function (110)
  • History Mystery Detective Squad, investigating local history (111)

 

5-8 Benchmark II-A — Skills: Analyze and evaluate the characteristics and purposes of geographic tools, knowledge, skills and perspectives and apply them to explain the past, present, and future in terms of patterns, events, and issues.

Grade
Performance Standards
5-8
  • Make and use different kinds of maps, globes, charts, and databases.
  • Demonstrate how different areas of the United States are organized and interconnected.
  • Identify and locate each of the fifty states and capitols of the United States.
  • Identify tribal territories within states.
  • Employ fundamental geographic vocabulary (e.g., latitude, longitude, interdependence, accessibility).
  • Demonstrate a relational understanding of time zones.
  • Use spatial organization to communicate information
  • Identify and locate natural and man-made features of local, regional, state, national, and international locales
  • Navigating the Mediterranean, reading a map (56)
  • Can You Fathom This? measuring nautical speed and ocean depth (81)
  • Color Coded Communications, understanding symbols (88)
  • To Play Spin to Win, a memory building team activity (98)
  • Constitution's Retirement Fact Sheet (99)

 

5-8 Benchmark III-A: Understand the structure, functions, and powers of government (local, state, tribal and national).

Grade
Performance Standards
5-8
  • Explain how the three branches of national government function and understand how they are defined in the United States Constitution.
  • Identify the fundamental ideals and principles of our republican form of government (e.g., inalienable rights (“life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness”), the rule of law, justice, equality under the law).
  • Identify and describe the significance of American symbols, landmarks, and essential documents (e.g., Declaration of Independence; United States Constitution; Bill of Rights; Federalist Papers; Washington, DC; Liberty Bell; Gettysburg Address; Statute of Liberty; government to government accords; Treaty of Guadalupe Hildago; Gadsden Purchase).
  • Compare and contrast the basic government sovereignty of local, state, tribal and national governments.
  • Understanding Freedom (11)
  • Poetry Power, understanding the power of words (104-5)

 

5-8 Benchmark III-B: Explain the significance of symbols, icons, songs, traditions, and leaders of New Mexico and the United State that exemplify ideals and provide continuity and a sense of unity.

Grade
Performance Standards
5-8
  • Explain the significance and importance of American customs, symbols, landmarks, and celebrations.
  • Identify and summarize contributions of various racial, ethnic, and religious groups to national identity.
  • Describe selected ethnic and religious customs and celebrations that enhance local, state, tribal, and national identities.
  • Victory in the News, reading an historical, secondary source (62)
  • Eyewitness Account, reading a primary source (63)
  • Hear Ye, Hear Ye! writing a bBroadside (69)
  • Poetry Power, understanding the power of words (104-5)

 

5-8 Benchmark III-D: Explain how individuals have rights and responsibilities as members of social groups, families, schools, communities, states, tribes, and countries.

Grade
Performance Standards
5-8
  • Explain the meaning of the American creed that calls on citizens to safeguard the liberty of individual Americans within a unified nation, to respect the rule of law, and to preserve the constitution of local, state, tribal and federal governments.
  • A Personal Point of View, conveying the facts (57)
  • Victory in the News, reading an historical, secondary source (62)
  • Eyewitness Account, reading a primary source (63)
  • Hear Ye, Hear Ye! writing a broadside (69)

 

5-8 Benchmark IV-A: Explain and describe how individuals, households, businesses, governments, and societies make decisions, are influenced by incentives (economic as well as instrinsic) and the availability and use of scarce resources, and that their choices involve costs and varying was of allocating.

Grade
Performance Standards
5-8
  • Understand the impact of supply and demand on consumers and producers in a free enterprise system.
  • Understand the patterns of work and economic activities in New Mexico and the United States (e.g., farming, ranching, oil and gas production, high tech, manufacturing, medicine).
  • Describe the aspects of trade.
  • Explain how voluntary trade is not coercive.
  • A Personal Point of View, conveying the facts (57)
  • Victory in the News, reading an historical, secondary source (62)
  • Eyewitness Account, reading a primary source (63)

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Grades 9-12
9-12 Benchmark I-D — Skills: Use critical thinking skills to understand and communicate perspectives of individuals, groups, and societies from multiple contexts.

Grade
Performance Standards
9-12
  • Understand how to use the skills of historical analysis to apply to current social, political, geographic, and economic issues.
  • Apply chronological and spatial thinking to understand the importance of events.
  • Describe primary and secondary sources and their uses in research.
  • Explain how to use a variety of historical research methods and documents to interpret and understand social issues (e.g., the friction among societies, the diffusion of ideas).
  • Distinguish “facts” from authors’ opinions and evaluate an author’s implicit and explicit philosophical assumptions, beliefs, or biases about the subject.
  • Interpret events and issues based upon the historical, economic, political, social, and geographic context of the participants.
  • Analyze the evolution of particular historical and contemporary perspectives.
  • Explain how to use technological tools to research data, verify facts and information, and communicate findings.
  • Does America Need Warships? comparing yesterday and today (22)
  • Evaluating, Taking and Defending a Position, holding a debate (22)
  • Change for the Better or Worse? conducting a panel discussion (40)
  • Striking Parallels in History, compare and contrast (58)
  • Fulton: No Folly to Brits, interpreting a political cartoon (64)

 

9-12 Benchmark II-E: Analyze and evaluate how economic, political, cultural, and social processes interact to shape patterns of human populations, and their interdependence, cooperation, and conflict.

Grade
Performance Standards
9-12
  • Analyze the factors influencing economic activities (e.g., mining, ranching, agriculture, tribal gaming, tourism, high tech) that have resulted in New Mexico’s population growth.
  • Analyze the effects of geographic factors on major events in United States and world history.
  • Analyze the interrelationships among settlement, migration, population-distribution patterns, landforms, and climates in developing and developed countries.
  • Analyze how cooperation and conflict are involved in shaping the distribution of political, social and economic factors in New Mexico, United States, and throughout the world (e.g., land grants, border issues, United States territories, Israel and the Middle East, the former Soviet Union, and Sub-Saharan Africa).
  • Analyze how cultures shape characteristics of a region.
  • Analyze how differing points of view and self-interest play a role in conflict over territory and resources (e.g., impact of culture, politics, strategic locations, resources).
  • Evaluate the effects of technology on the developments, changes to, and interactions of cultures.
  • Does America Need Warships? comparing yesterday and today (22)
  • Evaluating, Taking and Defending a Position, holding a debate (22)
  • Change for the Better or Worse? conducting a panel discussion (40)
  • Striking Parallels in History, compare and contrast (58)
  • Fulton: No Folly to Brits, interpreting a political cartoon (64)

 

9-12 Benchmark III-B: Analyze how the symbols, icons, songs, traditions, and leaders of New Mexico and the United States exemplify ideals and provide continuity and a sense of unity.

Grade
Performance Standards
9-12
  • Analyze the qualities of effective leadership.
  • Evaluate the impact of United States political, tribal, and social leaders on New Mexico and the nation.
  • Analyze the contributions of symbols, songs, and traditions toward promoting a sense of unity at the state and national levels.
  • Evaluate the role of New Mexico and United States symbols, icons, songs, and traditions in providing continuity over time.
  • What a Glorious/Tragic Day! working with rhyme and meter (70)
  • Our Town, an oral history project (100)

 

9-12 Benchmark III-D: Understand how to exercise rights and responsibilities as citizens by participating in civic life and using skills that include interacting, monitoring, and influencing.

Grade
Performance Standards
9-12
  • Describe and analyze the influence of the non-elected (e.g., staff, lobbyists, interest groups).
  • Analyze the rights and obligations of citizens in the United States, to include:
    • connections between self-interest, the common good, and the essential element of civic virtue as described in The Federalist Papers Numbers 5 and 49
    • obeying the law, serving on juries, paying taxes, voting, registering for selective service, and military service.
  • Demonstrate the skills needed to participate in government at all levels, to include:
    • analyze public issues and the political system
    • evaluate candidates and their positions
    • debate current issues
  • Analyze factors that influence the formation of public opinion (e.g., media, print, advertising, news broadcasts, magazines, radio).
  • Evaluate standards, conflicts, and issues related to universal human rights and their impact on public policy.
  • Evaluating, Taking and Defending a Position, holding a debate (22)
  • Does America Need Warships? comparing yesterday and today (22)
  • Change for the Better or Worse? conducting a panel discussion (40)
  • To Fight or Not to Fight, class discussion (58)
  • Fulton: No Folly to Brits, interpreting a political cartoon (64)

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