All Hands on Deck: Learning Adventures Aboard Old Ironsides
curriculum home
     
how to use this online curriculum
preview activities
table of contents
video
search
USS Constitution, Johnson


All Hands on Deck: Learning Adventures Aboard "Old Ironsides" and the Maryland State Content Standards for Social Studies

Students will demonstrate an understanding of historical and current events using chronological and spatial thinking, develop historical interpretations, and frame questions that include collecting and evaluating information from primary and secondary sources.

Rationale:
Social Studies curriculum should reflect the integration of content and skills. Students should apply these thinking processes and skills while studying the content of United States history, world history, geography, political systems, and economics.

 

1.1 Students will use thinking processes and skills to gain knowledge of history, geography, economics, and political systems.

In the context of home, school, and community, at the end of
grade 3, students know and are able to:

1.1.3.1 apply the concept of time by placing key events in chronological order (MLO 1.1);

  • Consitution Concentration, a game of memory and matching pairs (18)
  • First, Second, Thirds..., making a time line (18)

1.1.3.2 find, interpret, and apply information specific to social studies disciplines by reading, asking questions and observing (MLO 1.2);

  • USS Constitution — What Do You Know? (10)
  • Let's Decide, a role-playing activity (10)
  • Coloring Counting and Chain of Command, puttig objects in order (42)
  • Good Luck, Bad Luck, writing about personal experience (67)

1.1.3.3 find, interpret, and apply information from primary and secondary sources including pictures, graphics, maps, atlases, artifacts, and timelines (MLO 1.3);

  • Navigating the Mediterranean, reading a map (56)
  • Draw What You Hear, a listening and drawing exercise (61)
  • World Exploring, understanding other places, other cultures (97)
  • Wheel of Change, observing detail and understanding a process (103)

1.1.3.4 describe how their community has changed over time and how people have contributed to its change, drawing from maps, photographs, newspapers and other sources;

1.1.3.5 identify the causes and effects of events (MLO 1.4);

  • USS Constitution — What Do You Know? (10)

1.1.3.6 identify situations and processes for making decisions (MLO 1.5);

  • Let's Decide, a role-playing activity (10)
  • Coloring Counting and Chain of Command, puttig objects in order (42)

1.1.3.7 read and interpret problems from social studies content (MLO 1.6);

  • Let's Decide, a role-playing activity (10)
  • Good Luck, Bad Luck, writing about personal experience (67)

1.1.3.8 summarize the main points of an issue explaining different viewpoints (MLO 1.7);

1.1.3.10 provide examples of social institutions and the media that have an impact on individuals (MLO 1.8); and

  • Hear Ye, Hear Ye! writing a broadside (69)

1.1.3.12 frame questions that can be answered by historical study and research.

 

In the context of Maryland up to contemporary times, and U.S. History through 1790, at the end of grade 5, students know and are able to do everything required at earlier grades and are able to:

1.1.5.1 apply the concept of change over time by organizing turning point events in chronological order and applying chronological terms correctly, including decade, century, and generation (MLO 1.1);

  • Consitution Concentration, a game of memory and matching pairs (18)
  • First, Second, Thirds..., making a time line (18)
1.1.5.2 find, apply, and organize information specific to social studies disciplines by reading, asking questions and observing (MLO 1.2);
  • USS Constitution — What Do You Know? (10)
  • Let's Decide, a role-playing activity (10)
  • Coloring Counting and Chain of Command, puttig objects in order (42)
  • Good Luck, Bad Luck, writing about personal experience (67)

1.1.5.3 find, interpret, and organize primary and secondary sources of information including pictures, graphics, maps, atlases, artifacts, timelines, political cartoons, videotapes, journals, and government documents (MLO 1.3);

  • Navigating the Mediterranean, reading a map (56)
  • Draw What You Hear, a listening and drawing exercise (61)
  • Poetry Power, understanding the power of words (104)

1.1.5.4 pose and ask questions about their local community from a spatial perspective, describing how and why families and individuals migrated and settled there and how their community has changed over time;

1.1.5.5 identify and analyze the causes and effects of historical events (MLO 1.4);

  • USS Constitution – What Do You Know (10)
  • Poetry Power, understanding the power of words (104)

1.1.5.6 make decisions and analyze decisions of individuals, groups, and institutions (MLO 1.5);

  • Let’s Decide, a role-playing activity (10)
  • Coloring Counting and Chain of Command, puttig objects in order (42)

1.1.5.7 analyze problems drawn from social studies, identify resources, prepare solutions, and provide justification (MLO 1.6);

  • Let’s Decide, a role-playing activity (10)
  • A Personal Point of View, conveying the facts (57)
  • Good Luck, Bad Luck, writing about personal experience (67)

1.1.5.8 analyze issues by stating the issue, identifying and summarizing viewpoints, and drawing conclusions based on evidence (MLO 1.7);

1.1.5.10 analyze the impact of social institutions and the media on the behavior of individuals and groups (MLO 1.8); and

1.1.5.12 develop effective questions to acquire information about people, events, civilizations, and other social studies concepts.

  • Coloring Counting and Chain of Command, puttig objects in order (42)
  • What the Crew Do, using resources and references (45)

to top

In the context of U.S. History through 1877, world history through the Middle Ages, and in contemporary world geography, at the end of grade 8, students know and are able to do everything required at earlier grades and are able to:

1.1.8.1 construct various timelines of key events, people, and periods of the historic eras studied and explain how major events are related to each other (MLO 1.1);

  • A Navy of Six, reading a table (21)
  • What Happened When? creating a time line (22)
  • Spin to Win, a memory-building team activity (98-99)
  • Constitution’s “Retirement” Fact Sheet (98-99)

1.1.8.2 find, evaluate, and organize information specific to social studies disciplines by reading, asking questions, investigating and observing (MLO 1.2);

  • USS Constitution – What Do You Know? (10)
  • Understanding Freedom (11)
  • A Navy of Six, reading a table (21)
  • What the Crew Do, using resources and references (45)
  • Victory in the News, reading an historical, secondary source (62)

1.1.8.3 find, interpret, evaluate, and organize primary and secondary sources of information including pictures, graphics, maps, atlases, artifacts, timelines, political cartoons, videotapes, journals, and government documents (MLO 1.3);

  • A Navy of Six, reading a table (21)
  • A Personal Point of View, conveying the facts (57)
  • Victory in the News, reading an historical, secondary source (62)
  • History Mystery, writing historical fiction (62)
  • Eyewitness Account (63)
  • Poetry Power, understanding the power of words (104)

1.1.8.4 pose and answer questions about geographic distributions and patterns shown on maps, graphs, charts, models, and databases to explain historical migration of people, expansion and disintegration of empires, and growth of economic systems;

1.1.8.5 identify and distinguish cause and effect and sequence and correlation in historic events (MLO1.4);

  • USS Constitution – What Do You Know? (10)

1.1.8.6 make decisions and analyze decisions of individuals, groups, and institutions in other times and places, and evaluate the consequences (MLO 1.5);

1.1.8.7 analyze problems drawn from social studies and evaluate information related to the problem, and propose and justify solutions (MLO 1.6);

1.1.8.8 analyze issues by stating and summarizing the issue, evaluating different viewpoints, and drawing conclusions based on data (MLO 1.7);

1.1.8.9 explain why historic interpretations vary (MLO 1.8);

1.1.8.10 evaluate the impact of social institutions and the print media on the behavior of individuals and groups (MLO 1.9); and

  • Victory in the News, reading an historical, secondary source (62)
  • Poetry Power, understanding the power of words (104)

1.1.8.12 identify topics, ask and evaluate questions, and develop ideas leading to inquiry, investigation, and research.

  • Writing an Artifact, describing, relating form and function (110)
  • Prove It! understanding inference (110)
  • History Mystery Detective Squad, investigating local history (111)

 

In the context of U.S. History from 1877 through modern times, world history from the Renaissance to modern times and government, at the end of grade 12, students know and are able to do everything required at earlier grades and:

1.1.12.1 demonstrate understanding of the meaning, implication, and impact of historical events and hypothesize how events could have taken other directions (SFS 2.2.2, 2.2.3);

  • Does America Need Warships? comparing yesterday and today (22)
  • Evaluating, Taking and Defending a Position, holding a debate (22)
  • Our Town, an oral history project (100)

1.1.12.2 analyze how change happens at different rates at different times; that some aspects can change while others remain the same; that change is complicated and affects not only technology, economics, and politics, but values and beliefs (SFS 2.1.1, 2.2.6);

  • Does America Need Warships? comparing yesterday and today (22)
  • Evaluating, Taking and Defending a Position, holding a debate (22)
  • Trades and Skills, conducting a survey (28)
  • Change for the Better or Worse? conducting a panel discussion (40)
  • USS Constitution – What Do You Know? (10)
  • Crew Pay, understanding historical context (46)
  • Striking Parallels in History, compare and contrast (58)
  • To Fight or Not to Fight, class discussion (58)
  • Fulton: No Folly to Brits, interpreting a political cartoon (64)
  • Where Yesterday is Tomorrow, paradox and the international date line (100)

1.1.12.3 assess the credibility of primary and secondary sources, assessing the accuracy and adequacy of the author’s details to support claims and noting instances of bias, propaganda and stereotyping, and draw sound conclusions (SFS 2.2.5. 2.2.6);

  • The Nitty Gritty, read and report (46)
  • Fulton: No Folly to Brits, interpreting a political cartoon (64)
  • Personal Observation, writing an eyewitness account (64)
  • Poetry Power, understanding the power of words (104)
  • Reasons to Believe, establishing facts from evidence (112)

1.1.12.4 use case studies and geographic information from a variety of sources such as data bases, field interviews, media services, and questionnaires to identify contemporary geographic problems and issues and consider the advantages and disadvantages of various solutions (SFS 2.2.3);

1.1.12.5 analyze the connections, causal and otherwise, between particular historical events and larger social, economic and political trends and developments (USH 1.1.2, WH 1.1.3, SFS 2.2.1);

  • USS Constitution – What Do You Know? (10)
  • Does America Need Warships? comparing yesterday and today (22)
  • Evaluating, Taking and Defending a Position, holding a debate (22)
  • Change for the Better or Worse? conducting a panel discussion (40)

1.1.12.6 analyze decisions made in the area of public policy, evaluate alternatives and consequences (G 1.1.4 SFS 2.2.3);

  • Does America Need Warships? comparing yesterday and today (22)
  • Evaluating, Taking and Defending a Position, holding a debate (22)
  • Change for the Better or Worse? conducting a panel discussion (40)
  • To Fight or Not to Fight, class discussion (58)

1.1.12.7 analyze problems drawn from social studies, establish criteria for solution, evaluate information related to the problem, and propose and justify solutions (SFS 2.2.3, 2.4.5);

  • Does America Need Warships? comparing yesterday and today (22)
  • Evaluating, Taking and Defending a Position, holding a debate (22)
  • Change for the Better or Worse? conducting a panel discussion (40)
  • To Fight or Not to Fight, class discussion (58)

1.1.12.8 evaluate issues by stating and summarizing the issue, and drawing conclusions based on conflicting data (SFS 2.2.6, 2.1.1);

  • Does America Need Warships? comparing yesterday and today (22)
  • Evaluating, Taking and Defending a Position, holding a debate (22)
  • Trades and Skills, conducting a survey (28)
  • Change for the Better or Worse? conducting a panel discussion (40)
  • To Fight or Not to Fight, class discussion (58)

1.1.12.9 explain different viewpoints in historical accounts of controversial events and determine the context in which the statements were made, including but not limited to, the questions asked, the sources used and the author’s perspective (SFS 2.1.1);

  • Does America Need Warships? comparing yesterday and today (22)
  • Evaluating, Taking and Defending a Position, holding a debate (22)
  • Change for the Better or Worse? conducting a panel discussion (40)

1.1.12.10 analyze the impact of the media on public opinion and the behavior of the electorate (G 1.1.4; SFS 2.2.3);

  • Fulton: No Folly to Brits, interpreting a political cartoon (64)

1.1.12.12 use clear research questions and coherent research methodology to elicit and present evidence from primary and secondary sources using available library, electronic and human resources;

  • Does America Need Warships? comparing yesterday and today (22)
  • Evaluating, Taking and Defending a Position, holding a debate (22)
  • Trades and Skills, conducting a survey (28)
  • Change for the Better or Worse? conducting a panel discussion (40)
  • Reasons to Believe, establishing facts from evidence (112)

1.1.12.13 identify community resources that preserve historical information and know how to access this knowledge (e.g., libraries, museums, historical societies, courthouse, world wide web, family records, elders) (SFS 3.2.1);

1.1.12.14 synthesize information from multiple sources, evaluating each source in terms of the author’s viewpoint or bias and use of evidence, identifying complexities and discrepancies in the information, and making distinctions between sound generalizations and misleading oversimplifications (SFS 2.2.5); and

  • Does America Need Warships? comparing yesterday and today (22)
  • Evaluating, Taking and Defending a Position, holding a debate (22)
  • An Aphorism for Insight, interpreting a saying (112)

1.1.12.15 explain different points of view in historical accounts of controversial events and determine the context in which the statements were made (e.g., the questions asked, the sources used, the author’s perspective (SFS 2.2.6, 2.1.1).

  • Does America Need Warships? comparing yesterday and today (22)
  • Evaluating, Taking and Defending a Position, holding a debate (22)
  • Design a Figurehead, creating a design concept, incorporating symbolic representation (106)

to top

 

 
curriculum creditsuss constitution museum homecopyright information uss constitution museum logo