All Hands on Deck: Learning Adventures Aboard Old Ironsides
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USS Constitution, Johnson


All Hands on Deck: Learning Adventures Aboard "Old Ironsides" Related to Colorado Social Studies Standards

Standard 1
Students understand the chronological organization of history and know how to organize events and people into major eras to identify and explain historical relationships.

1.1 Students know the general chronological order of events and people in history.

5-8

As students in grades 5-8 extend their knowledge, what they know and are able to do includes:

• chronologically organizing major events and people of United States history; and

• describing significant events and people which form the foundation of United States history in the chronological context of the history of the Americas and the world.

  • A Navy of Six, reading a table (21)
  • What Happened When? creating a time line (22)
  • Victory in the News, reading an historical, secondary source (62)
  • A History Mystery, writing historical fiction (62)
  • Hear Ye, Hear Ye! writing a broadside (69)

9-12
As students in grades 9-12 extend their knowledge, what they know and are able to do includes:

• identifying events and people that characterize each of the major eras in United States and world history.

  • Category: American History, a quiz show activity (11)
  • Evaluating, Taking and Defending a Position, holding a debate (22)
  • Fulton: No Folly to Brits, interpreting a political cartoon (64)

1.2 Students use chronology to organize historical events and people.

K-4

In grades K-4, what students know and are able to do includes:

• creating timelines that show people and events in sequence using days, weeks, months, years, decades, and centuries; and

• creating a brief historical narrative that chronologically organizes people and events in the history of their family heritage, school, neighborhood, local community, or Colorado.

  • A Navy of Six, reading a table (21)
  • What Happened When? creating a time line (22)
  • Victory in the News, reading an historical, secondary source (62)
  • A History Mystery, writing historical fiction (62)
  • Hear Ye, Hear Ye! writing a broadside (69)

5-8
As students in grades 5-8 extend their knowledge, what they know and are able to do includes:

• constructing tiered timelines to show how different series of events happened simultaneously; and

• illustrating the time structure of events in historical narratives.

  • What Happened When? creating a time line (22)
  • A Personal Point of View, conveying the facts (57)
  • A History Mystery, writing historical fiction (62)
  • Hear Ye, Hear Ye!, writing a broadside (69)

9-12
As students in grades 9-12 extend their knowledge, what they know and are able to do includes:

• reconstructing the time structure and identifying connections found in historical narratives;

• using timelines to organize large quantities of historical information, compare different time periods and places, and answer historical questions; and

• describing how history can be organized, using various criteria (for example, thematically,chronologically, geographically) to group people and events.

  • Does America Need Warships? comparing yesterday and today (22)
  • Striking Parallels in History, compare and contrast (58)

1.3 Students use chronology to examine and explain historical relationships.

K-4
In grades K-4, what students know and are able to do includes:

• identifying cause-and-effect relationships in a sequence of events.

  • Let’s Decide, a role playing activity (10)
  • Constitution Concentration, a game of memory and matching pairs (18)
  • First, Second, Third…, making a time line (18)
  • Wheel of Change, observing detail and understanding a process (103)

5-8
As students in grades 5-8 extend their knowledge, what they know and are able to do includes:

• interpreting historical data to determine cause-effect and time-order relationships; and

• explaining patterns and identifying themes in related events over time.

  • Understanding Freedom (11)
  • What Happened When? creating a time line (22)
  • Blast Away, describing a sequence (39)

9-12
As students in grades 9-12 extend their knowledge, what they know and are able to do includes:

• distinguishing between cause-and-effect relationships and events that happen or occur concurrently or sequentially;

• analyzing and explaining cause-and-effect relationships using historical information that is organized chronologically;

• using both chronological order and the duration of events to detect and analyze patterns of historical continuity and change.

  • Change for the Better or Worse, conducting a panel discussion (40)
  • Striking Parallels in History, compare and contrast (58)

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STANDARD 2
Students know how to use the processes and resources of historical inquiry.

2.1 Students know how to formulate questions and hypotheses regarding what happened in the past and to obtain and analyze historical data to answer questions and test hypotheses.

K-4

In grades K-4, what students know and are able to do includes:

• posing and answering questions about the past; and

• gathering historical data from multiple sources (for example, oral histories, interviews, diaries, letters, newspapers, literature, speeches, texts, maps, photographs, art works, and available technology).

  • Constitution Concentration, a game of memory and matching pairs (18)
  • Draw What You Hear, a listening and drawing exercise (61)
  • World Exploring, understanding other places, other cultures (97)
  • Wheel of Change, observing detail and understanding a process (103)
  • Making a Display, matching languages and images (109)

5-8
As students in grades 5-8 extend their knowledge, what they know and are able to do includes:

• formulating historical questions based on examination of primary* and secondary* sources including documents, eyewitness accounts, letters and diaries, artifacts, real or simulated historical sites, charts, graphs, diagrams, and written texts;

• gathering information from multiple sources, including electronic databases, to understand events from multiple perspectives; and

• determining if the information gathered is sufficient to answer historical questions.

  • A Navy of Six, reading a table (21)
  • What the Crew Do, using resources and references (45)
  • A Personal Point of View, conveying the facts (57)
  • Eyewitness Account, reading a primary source (63)
  • Hear Ye, Hear Ye! writing a broadside (69)
  • To Play Spin to Win, a memory building team activity (98)
  • Poetry Power, understanding the power or words (104)

9-12
As students in grades 9-12 extend their knowledge, what they know and are able to do includes:

• formulating historical hypotheses from multiple, historically objective perspectives, using multiple sources; and

• gathering, analyzing, and reconciling historical information, including contradictory data, from primary and secondary sources to support or reject hypotheses.

  • Evaluating, Taking and Defending a Position, holding a debate (22)
  • Trades and Skills, conducting a survey (28)
  • Change for the Better or Worse? conducting a panel discussion (40)
  • The Nitty Gritty, read and report (46)
  • To Fight or Not to Fight, class discussion (58)
  • Fulton: No Folly to Brits, interpreting a political cartoon (64)
  • Our Town, an oral history project (100)
  • Reasons to Believe, establishing facts from evidence (112)

STANDARD 5
Students understand political institutions and theories that have developed and changed over time.

Rationale:
People living together in societies address the issues of cooperation and control through their political systems and ideologies. All societies endeavor to preserve law and security. A theme central to this area is the evolution of democratic forms of government and the long struggle for liberty, equality, justice, and dignity. The challenge for our nation, as a constitutional republic, is to provide liberty and justice for all citizens. To become effective citizens in a democratic republic, students must be able to deal with the inherent tensions and inevitable conflicts caused by the pursuit of both principles of liberty and equality, and of individual rights and justice. Students need to understand that none of these principles can be sacrificed during difficult times if democratic government is to endure.

5.1 Students understand how democratic ideas and institutions in the United States have developed, changed, and/or been maintained.

K-4
In grades K-4, what students know and are able to do includes:

• explaining the importance of national celebrations, symbols, and ideas in their historical context;

  • Wheel of Change, observing detail and understanding a process (103)

5.2 Students know how various systems of government have developed and functioned throughout history.

K-4

In grades K-4, what students know and are able to do includes:

• explaining why rules and laws have been established and enforced in schools, communities.

  • Coloring, Counting and Chain of Command, putting objects in order (42)
  • Simplified Skipper Says (80)

5.3 Students know how political power has been acquired, maintained, used, and/or lost throughout history.

9-12

As students in grades 9-12 extend their knowledge, what they know and are able to do includes:

• explaining how military conquest and invasion have been used to assume, maintain, and extend political power throughout history;

• describing and analyzing the major events in the expansion of the political power of the United States (for example, the American Revolution, the Louisiana Purchase, the Mexican War)

  • Does America Need Warships? comparing yesterday and today (22)
  • Evaluating, Taking and Defending a Position, holding a debate (22)
  • Striking Parallels in History, compare and contrast (58)
  • To Fight or Not to Fight, class discussion (58)
  • Fulton: No Folly to Brits, interpreting a political cartoon (64)

5.4 Students know the history of relationships among different political powers and the development of international relations.

K-4

In grades K-4, what students know and are able to do includes:

• giving examples of how members of families and communities depend on each other

  • Coloring, Counting and Chain of Command, putting objects in order (42)
  • World Exploring, understanding other places other cultures (97)

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